Tags Posts tagged with "interview"

interview

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Basketmouth-2

I’m sure you have all heard of the controversial rape joke made by Basketmouth on his Facebook account, which he later on apologized about.

Basketmouth recently had a seat-down interview with Adesope Olajide on “Live At Battersea” show where he apologizes again about the joke, but also says that as a comedian “you have the power to crack jokes because the truth is humor has no limits. You can crack jokes about death, living, anything you want to crack jokes about.”

Here is the rest of what he had to say:

Speaking on the rape joke scandal, Basketmouth said

Definitely I am sorry about what happened. The people that it offended…I won’t say the people that misunderstood but the people that it offended. It’s not like I left Nigeria because of that, I already booked my ticket since three months ago.

He went on to say backlash from the rape joke, limits him

It limits me though. Now it limits the type of jokes I’m going to be cracking right now. Sadly, every joke hits people the wrong way. If I crack jokes about food, there are people in third world countries saying, ‘Why is he cracking jokes about food? Have I chop na?’ They will just go on twitter and say ‘This guy should stop cracking jokes about food, I haven’t eaten’.”

When asked if he felt that there were any topics that are off limits for a comedian he replied,

No. If you’re a comedian, you have the power to crack jokes because the truth is humor has no limits. You can crack jokes about death, living, anything you want to crack jokes about. Humor has its own education that sends a message. Everything is funny. Everything in life is funny, there is humor in everything that we do. Society actually structures one. For me, the only thing that limits me is if I go for a church event I won’t crack any joke that has any X in it. Then if I go for an event where everyone is drinking and drunk with their wives, I’m not going to be cracking jokes about Noah and Solomon, I have to crack a joke that suits them. I crack my jokes according to the audience. So that’s my limit. I limit myself according to the audience, but when it comes to jokes there shouldn’t be any limit. But because of the culture and everything, you have to respect the fact that people might find it offensive and just hold back.”

He finally stated,

The truth about jokes is no matter what type of joke you crack there are people in the audience that won’t find it funny. People get offended for different reasons.  Wale Gates was telling me about a joke he cracked about his wife and how someone was upset and said, ‘Why would you crack a joke about your wife.’ And he said ‘Look, she’s my wife. If anyone is going to be upset, can you let her be upset?’ And she heard the joke before and she wasn’t upset. People takes jokes in different ways, unfortunately everybody made it look like it’s the first joke that I’m cracking. I cracked a joke about “Two things involved” and it ended up being a positive angle and nobody talked about it. The only joke that people like that I’ve cracked right now is about me dying. I cracked a joke about my funeral and they loved it.

 

 

Photo Credit: Michael Tubes Creation

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Endia
Endia
Endia
Endia

Endia popularly known as “Mr 48″ or The Sound Man and one of the members of GRIP Boiz shouldn’t be introduced anymore in the music industry as a newbie but one of the super talented people we hear everyday.

Adaoha of Jaguda catches up with the buzzing star for a little chat, and we discuss his music origins, plans for the future, and his daily motivation.

Endia born Ujah Lawrence is from Benue State – Idoma by tribe. He grew up in Jos and joined the school choir in JS2 where he sang in the soprano. Later he joined school band- CSJ Boyz (St Joseph Catholic Schhol) at the time and it was there music became his love.

Q: How was the name “Endia” born?

A: Endia is a name I adopted from my family. My late grand mother used to call me that whenever she saw me & I kinda liked the name. So when I finally decided to settle for music, cudnt think of a better option. Just stuck with that- ‘Endia’.

Q: You have two singles that are very popular right now, “48” and “Raving”, what is your genre of music called?

A: My music, like I said on “48” is a fusion of Afro, hip hop & dancehall/ragga. With all this put together, it makes it kinda difficult to categorize, so I just term the fusion as “Vibrationz”

 

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Q: Vibrationz! Hmm nice. 48 was a hit, produced by Chopstix. What was going through your mind when you were in the studio voicing it?

A: To be honest, I didnt really have anything in mind. Just wanted to do something entirely different. Something that wasn’t common.
Even though I didnt exactly think or imagine it would become a hit as it turned out to be.

Q: Let’s talk Grip Boiz, as a faithful follower of Grip Boiz since my unijos days, you are a part of that talented group, could maybe satisfy abit of our curiosity and give a hint about an album release?

A: Gripboiz/GripMUZIK will put out an album soon, hopefully. We are really interested in strengthening our fan base- as individual artistes [Endia, J-milla, YungL & Chopstix] & also as a team- GripBoiz. Fortunately, that’s coming together fine. So I guarantee every lover & supporter that an album will come forth very very soon. We are continually putting in work to ensure that our fans are satisfied.

Q: Interesting. Do you play any musical instrument?

A: Not really. But am learning to play the keyboard

Q: Music aside, when you are not in the studio, what do you do to chill?

A: When am not in the studio, am either playing game, out hanging with friends, listening to music, reading a book or just chilling watching TV.

Q: Do you have any style icon? If yes, then who? Why do you like that style?

A: Yea most def! In the new generation, I love Kanye West’s style. Because he’s very confident in his style & always dares to try out new stuff in different forms. He could either keep it simple or street & still be on point. That’s just brilliant in regards to style.

 

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Q: Let me drift a bit, what’s the best fashion accessory you like to see on a lady? Why?

A: Err.. I actually do love women fashion & always admire those that keep it 100. With that said, my favorite lady accessory has to be wristwatch.

Q: What accessory will you feel naked without?

A: I’d totally feel naked without my glasses

Q: What motivates you daily?

A: My motivation comes from God & the people around me.

Q: Finally, what next for Endia? New single or maybe an album?

A: Well, an album is definitely gonna come, but for now expect more & more music- singles, collaborations, features. It’s Like That!

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Factory78tv caught up with Afrobeats artiste/hit maker Dj Zeez at a Smade entertainment event held at Yager bar in central London. The “fokasibe and Bobbie FC” crooner is in the UK touring with SMG’s Sauce kid.In this brief interview Dj Zeez talks about his current Vanilla records,album plans/directions and more importantly his latest single “fido dido” ft Eva.

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We all know Iyanya and his hit track Kukere. Check out his interview with iROKtv. Iyanya tells iROKtv of his journey to stardom. On this interview he talks about his family, his introduction to music (first as a rapper), his journey on Project Fame and what came after. Get to know how this talented Hip hop artiste has been able to keep up with the fame. I must say, he’s quite articulate in conversation.

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We recently brought you the news about 9ice interview, talking about his childhood, marital life, and the sucess of his album, and his interest in becoming a politican. Here is a full iterview he had on sunrise daily with channels Television.

“9ice is going back to school to become a Lawyer” Interesting!!

Watch and enjoy the Interview.
P.s His Album Concert is On March 11th, If You are in Lagos , Make sure you Don’t miss it.

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You Just Gotta Love this Man, The Apako Master. Here is an interview he had at fm station. He used the medium to clear rumors about his fight with MI and how he got mobbed by his fans at one of his shows to mention a few. Below are freestyles he had with Vector, (seems like we are expecting something from both of them) and freestyle with jaywon and joel from their released track.

This is a fun Video, enjoy!

Interview

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Freestyle with Vector
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Freestyle with Jaywon, Joel
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Factory78tv spoke to the reserved Afrobeat superstar 9ice backstage at the 2011 edition of Julius Agwu’s comedy show in London “crack ya ribs”. The shy star talked about not letting all the stories that has littered the media in the last year derail him from focussing on his art, his upcoming album and his excitement about his Alopomeji protégée Seriki. Watch the short and insightful interview right here.

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Apparently this is Wizkid’s second interview on Factory78. They Just Love the young man,they talked about his new album, superstar and what’s next. Also he cleared the rumour about him impregnating some unilag babe. Enjoy

PRESS RELEASE
Bank holiday weekend in the UK saw the emergence of Afrobeat as a mainstream sound and one of the stars that made this happen is “star boy” wizkid. Coming off his successful performance at the HMV Apollo, he had the chance to sit down with Factory78tv and talk about his new found fame, The release of his incredible and successful debut album, clear surging rumours about dropping out of school and more recently pregnancy rumours. Wizkid aka Ayo Balogun is as charming as ever as he thanks his fans for their unwavering support so far.

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Nigerian music duo, Bracket were in the UK when the folks from SWAG TV were able to catch up with them for an interview. Bracket’s latest single “Muah Muah” has been making its waves all over the globe, and the duo is set to release another single in a few days titled “Me & You”… Be sure to look out for that right here on Jaguda.com.

For now check out the interview with the SWAG TV peoples

SWAG TV envisions a new generation of young Africans who have their own icons to look up to and aspire to be like . The show is a platform for the younger generation to get up close and personal with these icons.

SWAG is an acronym that stands for Something We Africans Got. SWAG TV is the baby of former beauty Queen, now celebrity presenter Primrose Mutsigiri. SWAG SHOW is a subsidiary of SWAG TV.The show is a platform to celebrate achievers of African decent in the industries of arts, sports and entertainment. The SWAG show is fun filled and casual in its form. The show will focus on the stars’achievements, lifestyles, homes, cars, investments, relationships, up-to date stories and all the juicy gossip.

The debut interview on the SWAG Show was with the famous award winning Duo Bracket, the “Yori Yori”boys from Nigeria. Hear about their latest projects, their history, their love lives and even got to see what colour boxers they where wearing.

The SWAG Show is currently an online show which will be broadcast on African cable TV in the near future. SWAG TV is the new age platform to show the world “Something We Africans Got!”

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Check this interview with Mr. Incredible from the folks at Ladybrille blogazine. This is done shortly after the MI2 UK Launch concert in London.

Signed to Chocolate City music label in Nigeria, Jude Abaga aka Mr. Incredible aka M.I made his official debut, in Nigeria, with his Freshman Album ‘Talk About It,’ which was released on December 11th, 2008. In 2009, Ladybrille Magazine introduced M.I, in an exclusive, on the cover of its February issue, as a future rising star to watch to its Western influential readership. Since then, M.I has gone on to win over 14 Awards including Best Hip-hop and Best New Act at the 2009 MTV MAMA Awards. The rising global African music star has also been nominated nineteen (19) times, since 2009, for numerous awards including his nomination, last year, at the 2010 BET Awards.

Hosted by Ladybrille’s Maria Okanrende, The Ladybrille Magazine MI2 The Movie UK Launch Exclusive Interview features a one-on-one with the rap star on his UK launch event, his career and rising exposure in the US market; including his appearance on the Wendy Williams Show and his nomination at the 2010 BET Awards, and his hope to win a Grammy for his country and for Africa, among many topics.

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Eva Alordiah. That is one name that has jumped into the scene head first since this year started. For those that have been following, I mentioned her as one of my 6 artists that will blow in 2011, and so far so good. She has been all over the place, especially after her hit, I Done Did It, where she put her stamp on the Naija hip-hop history wall. With tunes “Make Em Say”, “Down Low” etc, it looks like we’ll have to get used to seeing Eva for a while.

I was able to catch this multi-talented lady while she was working on an overnight session in the studio. Talk about putting in the work. You gotta respect the hustle. I no go give too much gist, but check out my one on one interview with her, and find more about her, her music, and what she finds attractive in man (she told it like it is lol). Check it out.

Aribaba: For the people that don’t know who you are (I’m sure not many), tell us a bit about yourself… A little introduction if you will.

Eva: Well my name is Eva Alordiah. I’m from Delta state. I’m a graduate of computer science. I’ve been doing music pretty much since I was 16… on and off, on and off, but I’m on it now for real. I’m trying to do as much as I can in the time that God has allocated for me.

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Aribab: So your first name is Eva right?

Eva: Actually my first name is Elohor. Elohor is my delta name. Eva is my English name. Coming into the industry, I just decided to stick to my English name.

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Aribaba: Besides music, You’re also a make up artist right? How did you get into that?

Eva: Umm… I got into fashion. I’m actually a tailor as well… I sew. Fashion designer if you will. I fell into fashion designing when I was in secondary school. I started sketching my little designs here and there, and one time I ran into this beautifully made up girl, and I was “wow… how did you do that on yourself?” So I started researching makeup, and all the other aspects of makeup that we don’t know about.

It pretty came from the love of fashion, and makeup and all that stuff. I think I started buying makeup when I was 15 or so, and I started practicing on myself and my friends. At some point when I was in the university I went for a few weeks course, and realized that I was actually better than a lot of people that were “professionals.”

Today I own my makeup business. I run a makeup school and do makeup training. I have makeup artists that have graduated under me, and have started their own businesses. So I feel very proud of myself right about now.

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Aribaba: How did you get into music? Like at what time did you just figure, I can actually rap. I can do this, and I’m gonna take it seriously.

Eva: *laughs* You know that time when we were young, and we would listen to hip-hop, and play back record on cassette tapes. I think I recorded all my favorite hip-hop songs over my momsy’s gospel tapes. She would go into her car and play her gospel tapes and she’ll be hearing this very slick Eminem, and Jay Z coming from it, and she’ll be like “What?”

I think it was when I was 14, that I was like “Yo I can rap” and then I started writing, and here we are.

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Aribaba: Your first official record which was on straight butter’s mixtape, was “Make Em Say.” How did that come about?

Eva: Yea that was supposed to be my first official record, but the first record I put out for people to hear was on Lil Wayne’s A Millie instrumental, “I Dey Play”… that’s the one that came out first. That was actually the first time I ever recorded anything. I listen to that song today, and I’m like “Jesus… Did I do that?”

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Aribaba: I saw the video for Make em say, and heard the song before I heard the A Millie track, and I was like “Ah… who’s this babe?”

Eva: Make em say was extra-ordinary though. I got to work wit Str8 butta, and it put in that very hip-hop grimy setting. I really loved working with him, It was fun.

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Aribaba: So how did you feel about the reception of your first record? A lot of artists don’t know what to expect when they release their first record, and for you a lot of people were like “Ah Ah this babe”… You had the swag and everything going for u also. How did you feel knowing that the reception was great?

Eva: You know with my first record I didn’t even know that people would like it. You know Nigerians now… I thought people were gonna be like “who’s this one copying MI?” But the first time I performed the song was at the beach, and there were so many people, and girls were screaming my name, and I was “wow… ole boy it be like say I don blow o” *laughs*… It was crazy, and they were singing back. It was nice. I swear to God I will never forget that moment. It was just beautiful.

Audio Response:

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Aribaba: So being a female in the industry, and more especially the rap game, how is that like? How have you been able to get to the point that you’re at right now?

Eva: I think I have a strong head. I’m just generally stubborn and strong headed. It puts me in trouble sometimes tho. On the flipside though, it keeps me going. I just have to keep going, and I think God helps as well. There’s so many times I just drop the pen and go “F it, I ain’t doing this anymore,” but somehow God finds a way to pull you back up, and tells you “you’re gonna have to do this, whether you like it or not.” I think it’s the strength from God to be able to push when you don’t want to push anymore.

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Aribaba: So what are you influences in music? Both in and out of naija?

Eva: From the beginning it was mostly Eminem. All his old stuff, Marshall Mathers LP etc. Then I started going back to hip-hop before me. Dead Prez, KRS one, Rakim, Common etc. All those people that are much older than I am. Listening to all these poets etc. I think I take a lil bit of this and that from everywhere. Oh yea, mos def also.

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Aribaba: So some peeps have said you sound like Nikki Minaj, or that you’re trying to sound like Nikki. What do you have to say about that?

Eva: You know seriously, I think it’s a psychological thing. It’s just psychological for a listener or a fan of music to listen to Nikki from over there, and listen to me from over here. The first thing they want to do is compare, or connect the dots. It’s just a human psychological thing.

I try as much as possible not to let that affect me. I mean I know I don’t sound like Nikki. I don’t think I do.

I mean Nikki has been around for a long time. I’ve known of her from way back. It’s just that she’s blown mainstream now, and Nigerians are getting attached to the whole Nikki frenzy, but I’ve been rapping now. I don dey hear since. So I think it’s just a psychological thing. People just feel the need to compare what’s in vogue over there with what’s happening over here.

You know it’s good now sha, cos when I came out with “I Dey Play” I had people saying I sounded like MI for a long time. I mean it’s good now that I don’t sound like MI and I sound like somebody else *laughs*

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Aribaba: Your joint I done did it (which is like a daily tune for me) has been majorly successful, and you’ve been buzzing from your other singles & features. So what’s next for Eva?

Eva: We have GIGO coming out. GIGO is my baby. One thing I like about GIGO is the fact that I’m gonna be so many different Evas in one cd. You’ll listen to me and I sound like Terry G, another time I’m singing, and you can probably hear some fuji in GIGO. That’s what GIGO is about. It’s a lot of Evas for the fans to enjoy. I hope… I really hope the fans love it. Please pray for me *laughs*

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Aribaba: So Do you have a date for that?

It’s actually ready now. I’m being held back by one track. Just one track. You guys are going to remember this. I’m saying it now, the track is “Never Say Goodbye.” It’s holding me back cos it’s a very deep song, and I’m putting myself in the 3rd person singular persona. It’s just been difficult to write. The EP will come out soon sha.

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Aribaba: It’s been about a year since Da Grin died, and you had the opportunity to interact with him, and even share studio time with him, How did his passing affect you?

Eva: You know it’s funny you asked that, cos I’m actually in the studio where Da Grin worked a lot. I’m with Sossick right now. I was sitting on the same bed that Da Grin used to sleep in, and it just felt like he was there. Anytime I get in the studio where Da Grin worked, it’s crazy the kind of energy I feel. It’s crazy, and I’m not just saying this, it’s actually the truth.

I cant believe it’s been one year already. It went by so fast. It’s good to see that his fans are still there and keeping him alive through his music. His death is just something we shouldn’t have to witness with anybody else again. It really brought a lot of people down. It brought me down as well.

I really don’t like talking about it. It was something pretty hard to get over. I had to make “Tonight” the Da Grin tribute, cos writing is one of the ways I relieve. It was probably the easiest way to get over it.

God rest his soul

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Aribaba: We’ve come a long way when it comes to hip-hop in Naija. Where do you think the Nigerian/African hip-hop industry will be in the next 5-10 years?

Eva: I think that we’re not even half as ready as we should be for what’s coming up. So many people are inspired by what we do, and by what people before us have been doing, that it’s becoming crazy. I was speaking to someone the other day and he was telling me how he was quitting school for hip-hop, and I’m like “yooo… that’s not what it’s about” *laughs*.

I mean it’s good that people want to be part of the movement, but quitting school is a bit too much.

In Nigeria we’ve come a long way. One time we were trying to sound like everybody from Yankee, but now we’ve able to infuse our talking drums, our fuji, our “dimkpa dimkpa” into our music. I mean right now, hip-hop as a genre is still like we borrowed it. As much as I hate to say it we actually did borrow it, but I believe 10-15 years from now we would’ve been able to curb to where it sounds like it’s us… like it’s our thing. It will sound like our own kind of music. When you listen to our hip-hop it’ll sound like our fuji.

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Aribaba: So *clearing throat*… Time to ask some other questions. So not only can you rap, you can ….

…Eva interjecting: Yes, Yes, I’m single *laughs*

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Aribaba: Well I guess I can go into the next question *laughs*… Eva After Dark. What’s the inspiration behind that?

Eva: *laughs… Well when I was 12 or so, I actually thought I was going to be a writer. I was in secondary school at the time, and I was writing in my little notes and I’ll pass it around the class, and my friends would be like “Oooh it’s good. It’s a good story.” I gave it to my dad, and I really thought I was going to be this successful writer. I really thought I was the sh*t. For some reason, I stopped writing stories and I started writing rap.

Right now, writing, as much as it’s something I’d like to do, even if it’s for a magazine or anything, is therapy for me. It helps me heal when I’m down. It helps me get up when I’m losing inspiration.

As for why it’s always sexually oriented on twitter *laughs* …it’s because for now it’s my way of getting people. These days if you put anything sexual in the midst of the youth today they’ll gravitated towards it. Let them fall in love with it now and think that it’s going to be sexual all the time, and then we begin to give them all the other aspects of Eva After dark.

For now it’s just to get em to love it and keep reading. The replies every time I post em is humongous.

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Aribaba: So tell us, what is your most attractive feature in a man?

Eva: Seriously let’s start with the physical cos that’s what we see first. People like to be very modest and say “oh it’s not all about the physical… Na Lie!!”

Basically he has to be all manner of sexy. Big, strong, and handsome. Then after that I can begin to say “oh he has to be nice… and he has to be caring, and he has to sweet.” But yo, he has to be big, and handsome, and built. You know… 6 packs and shit. Muscles and all

Aribaba: So you’re pretty much saying all that personality things nah story for tortoise be dat? *laughs*

Eva: Nah just for modesty jare. I have to talk this kind ting now. If I ask you now, what’s your kind of babe, you’ll tell me “she has to have a big African ass.” *laughs*.

So when he comes to me he has to be able to wear a really nice tee-shirt and make the tee-shirt look beautiful. Even if the tee-shirt is pink, I’ll let it pass as long as he’s wearing it right.

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Aribaba: So give your top 5 songs… currently or ever

Eva: Well I’ll give you the songs, and the story behind them or why I like them.

Need You Now by Lady Antebellum – This song I share with someone special. You know how you share a song with someone and anytime it comes on you think about him, or her.

Sossick ft. Da Grin – Jor oh. This song I heard in the studio last year, and I went crazy about it. Absolutely loved it. I really loved it, and it was just released recently and it just brings back that Da Grin spirit anytime I hear it.

Imogen Heap, Goodnight and Go – I love the whole album, but I really love this one. I share this song with someone too… ewww… I’m just a romantic freak. *laughs*. God help me.

I Done Did It, by Me – I really didn’t like this song initially. From the studio I didn’t like it, and Sossick would beg me like “Eva this song is dope”, and DJ Neptune called me and was like “Yo… Are you mad? You have to release this song.” So we put it out and the fans just loved it. Everybody was like “I done did it, I done did it.” Funny enough I love it now.

DJ Premiere’s Instrumental for Squeeze – I’ve been listening to this instrumental for days. Not sure I can count it as a favorite song sef. LOL.

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Aribaba: So, when it’s all said and done. When you hang up the mic, what would you like to be remembered for?

Eva: I would love to be remembered for all the craziness, all the stupidity I brought in… all the truth I bring in. It shouldn’t always be about fiction. There is so much life to be talked about that people don’t talk about anymore. Right now I feel like I inspire a whole bunch of people. I hope I do anyways… I hope I inspire girls, and inspire women. Pretty much for the good stuff.

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Last words…

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Check out Joints from Eva

*** I Done Did It

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*** Make Em Say

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*** Tonight (Da Grin Tribute)

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TWITTERwww.twitter.com/EvaAlordiah

FaceBook Fanpagehttp://www.facebook.com/pages/Eva/45157032483

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Femi Kuti has been touring North America and this past wednesday he had his show in Atlanta, GA where the good folks at ViewNaija.com were able to grab him for a one on one interview.

I’ve always admired Femi Kuti and his incredible work ethic, and great taste in music. I had the opportunity see to him live a few years ago, and if you’ve seen him live before you’ll understand how breath taking his performances can be.

In this interview he highlights his background, music with his father, and his take on issues in Nigeria.

Check it out.

 

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UK entertainer TBoy (Tolu Ogunmefun) aka Don’t Jealous Me chats to factory78 about his comedy career and more importantly his about-to-be-released song “hold on to me” . The UK born Nigerian entertainer who as a child developed a passion for performing talks in detail with factory78 about his discovery of various entertaining skills such as acting, singing and the inspiration for his comedy routines. He was very excited to talk about his song and how he cant wait for his fans to enjoy another chapter to him.

So it seems a lot of comedians are making a slow move into the music scene, from Julius Agwu to Tunde Ednut. And now ‘Don’t Jealous Me’ is following suit.. What are your thoughts on this?..

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In the past year I don’t think you’ll find any other artist that has risen to prominence as fast as this man right here, X.O Senavoe. I compare his sharp rising career to a lambogini going from 0 to 100 mph in 6 seconds. Freestyle after freestyle, single after single he has continued to impress the fans massively and given the haters enough stiff arms to cause permanent jaw dislocation. If you never heard of X.O Senavoe, you are REALLY now rocking with X.O Senavoe….whether you like or you no like. LOL.

I was able to catch this cat, (and I mean had to catch him cos he’s a tough one to grab these days) and have a one on one phone session with him.

He discusses his music, his influences, his mindset in the game, and of course we had to ask some personal questions.

His EP X-point-0 is probably one of the most anticipated of 2011, and with the hits he’s dropped so far the high expectation is definitely worth it. Let’s take a journey into Senavoe’s world.

Aribaba: For the people that don’t know who you are (I’m sure not many), tell us a bit about yourself… A little introduction if you will.

X.O Senavoe: Well my name is X.O Senavoe. The Extra-Ordinary, Mr. Extra-Ordinary. (laughs) I’ve been blessed with life and God’s goodness. I happen to be doing music, even though I have many interests and likes, and want to share with the world a little bit of what God has given me.

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Aribaba: Where did the name X.O come from? How did you come up with that?

X.O Senavoe: Well I had all these names. I thought about using Senavoe, but I scratched that at first cos I felt like I didn’t want to put that out in music. So after years and years of thinking (laughs) – nah, after a few weeks, so that people wouldn’t mistake me with anyone else, and after Uduak Oduok from Ladybrille used in it in an article, it became ‘the’ name.

My hope was that what I would do with music would and will be extra-ordinary, which is why I chose it. The funny thing is that, since “XOXO” is used by a lot of ladies when they write letters, etc., X.O is easy to remember – which is an added bonus. (laughs) That’s pretty much it.

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Aribaba: The general gist pretty much, is that you’ve been in music officially for less than a year. You’ve been a music lover for a while, but what made you just get up and say “ You know what? I’m gonna get into music. I’m gonna try this”

X.O Senavoe: You know people have different stories of how, they grew up singing or rapping and stuff, and evolved and all that. I’ll say that I’ve always loved music. I love rap, but really I’ve just loved and love music. I discovered rap when I was younger, and people would always ask what I thought about this rapper, musician, verse, etc, cos they knew how much I was a fiend.

About a year ago, I decided to make a list. The idea was quite simple: in 5 years if I were to look back at my life, what things would I regret not having done, and music was first on the list. The goal is to maximize God’s talents – and not bury them in the proverbial earth. It’s funny cos nobody… I’ll say about 99% of people that knew me didn’t even know I liked music to that point or that I would start doing music seriously.

So pretty much I decided that I’ll go into it, but more importantly that I’ll be good, great at it. I didn’t want to treat it like something by the way side. If I was gonna do it, I was gonna do it well and be one of the best, if not the best.

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Aribaba: I would attest to one of those that knew you way before the rapping. Way back when you were Law School president at Howard. Looking back now, I would never have guessed that you’d be doing what you’re doing now. (laughs)

X.O Senavoe: *laughs* Yea the theory, and often the reality, is that one thing garners more respect. But I’ve always believed it’s not about what you do really but how you do it, and why you do it. It’s all about dignity really.

For example, there was a point where cowries were legal tender – money, right? And whoever had the most cowries was the most revered person in the society. Now that we’ve switched out and we’re no longer using cowries anymore, are you telling me that more that guy is no longer important? Our self-worth should never be tied in to what we (humans) say is important. But, if anything, to how we make the most of the little God gave us. So I don’t think it’s really what you do or what you have, it’s how you do it.

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Aribaba: So your first official record, Taxi Music freestyle. (not sure if you had other before that which you wont tell us about laughs). The reception for that was crazy. A lot of people (including myself) were like, whoa!!! I’m sure as an artist, releasing your first recorded material, you dont know what to expect and all. Tell how you felt knowing the reception was great and how that encouraged you to continue.

X.O Senavoe: You know, I’ve never had self-doubt. I mean you know me a bit, and know that I internalize a lot. So I decide in my mind whether I think it’s a good thing or not, all before I even speak about it. I’m a harsh critic on myself. No one harder on me than I am myself, so before I dropped Taxi Music, I hoped that it would not be judged as my first recording, but as good music.

I think one time someone asked M.I at an interview who his favorite rapper was, and he mentioned my name, and at the time I hadn’t even started rapping, and I think it’s cos we shared musical ideas and all that. So based on that, the guys at NotJustOk contacted me, and told me they had heard about me and all that and I should give them a track. At the time I hadn’t even recorded or released anything, but I decided on the way to the studio that I wanted to do something over the “Maybach Music 2” instrumental. That’s why it starts off the way it did “I dropped this in a taxi on my way to Waxi’s …”

I hope I didn’t stray away too much. My point being, it doesn’t matter if it’s the first thing I ever recorded, I still wanted and want it to be great even 5 years from now.

Audio Response

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Aribaba: You have a pretty good relationship with Jude Abaga (MI). How did that come about?

X.O Senavoe: I’ve known Jude for a while – and he is simply a brother. He and others belong to a group of friends that I’ve known for a while, all of them very talented. They are all doing great in their fields. So for me it has always been a huge sense of pride to see that he was and is succeeding doing something he loves. It has always been support, initially from afar cos I wasn’t in Lagos (or Jos before that) with him, but it was a lot of support. Told friends about and shared the music, album, and so on. So when it came time for me to get into music, I was thankful that it in a way it wasn’t totally foreign to me.

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Aribaba: What  Are Your Biggest Influences in music?

X.O Senavoe: I remember, when I was a kid, my father used to have a wide range of music in records. From Simon and Garfunkel to Miriam Makeba. We used to go listen to what we now call “Traditional African Music” which I remain heavily influenced by. You’ll hear a lot of that in my debut album which comes after “XpointO”, my intro tape.

Other Influences include The Ramblers, Stevie Wonder, Big Daddy Kane (I remember that song 411 with Mary J. Blige and Grand Puba), BoyzIIMen, Aerosmith, Erykah Badu, Sam Cooke, Helen Baylor, Biggie, Jay, Nas, Reggie Rockstone, Fela, Yvonne Chaka Chaka and many others. But honestly, I have no one person I pattern myself after.

And I still think Michael Jackson is the greatest musician ever.

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Aribaba: Taxi music dropped and it was crazy. Victory came next, The Power, Messy/Messi (Black & Yellow Freestyle), Killing Me & then C4… So what’s next for you?

X.O.Senavoe: Yeah what’s next is “Xpoint0”, the Intro EP/tape. I can’t call it a mixtape cos it’s more than that, but it’s definitely not my debut album. Pretty much it’s like me giving a compilation of music, as an introduction of myself. It’ll have a few unoriginal beats… maybe 3 or so. Besides that everything else will be original, and will be out in a few weeks.

I really just want people to enjoy it. I’m not really trying to prove a point with this – I just want people to enjoy the music, spread it, share it, and so on.

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Aribaba: So how do you balance what goes into the EP and what goes into the Album?

X.O Senavoe: I mean, honestly I don’t separate my music like this is A class material and this is B class.

I see it as everything has to be “A” class stuff. The people, the fans, everybody listening deserves the best. I mean if someone were to listen to Xpoint0, I don’t want them to feel like “oh this is just the Intro Tape so he really didn’t go in like he would on an album.” I mean I want it where the EP/Tape could be nominated for Rap Album of the Year and be considered a classic. Just as I want the debut album which will follow to be – Music that anyone can enjoy, whether you’re from the streets of Manilla, Brighton, cruising through New York, Kumasi or in an air-conditioned office in Calabar.

It puts pressure on me though, cos I want both to be great. Not just about being a rapper, but about getting across to people. The major difference is that the debut album will have my core market – West Africa – in mind. I want folks on the street to ask, “Oboy, you get dat XO for der?”

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Aribaba: So your next single which should be coming out on Mother’s day (I think) is dedicated to your mother. Can you talk about the song, and what that song means to you?

X.O Senavoe: My Mother was phenomenal. After my father passed when I was about 10, she singlehandedly looked after me and several others who lived with her, and did it all with stoic resilience and a smile. Through multiple cancer bouts and several other setbacks, she remained a source of strength and an example of pure dedication to God. I miss her. “Mama Can You Hear Me” (tentatively titled) is an ode to her and all mothers and women around the world.

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Aribaba: Lyrically, you’re being compared to the best. How does that make you feel? It’s like a rookie, being compared to Michael Jordan already. How does that make you feel?

X.O Senavoe: Well … I feel like I’m Michael Jordan. I say that very humbly, but I do. You know, I feel like I’m Michael Jordan but I just started playing in the league. So there’s still a lot to learn. And I’m dedicated to ‘going there’.

Just like I said in Sauce Kid’s track (“Getting To The Money” off the Da Ripoff mixtape) – “Just started rapping so they’ve benefited/ Like Magic Johnson in 1980, a rookie with a ring, and already the stuff of legend”. Magic Johnson came into NBA in 1980, and he won a ring his first year. In his final game, he had 40 points, I believe, as center cos James Worthy ( I think) was injured so Magic had to play center and ended up being the Finals MVP that year.

So it doesn’t really matter how long I’ve been rapping for real. Trust me, I’ve paid dues, and will pay continue to pay dues. What I will do though is always approach it like I’m trying to be the best. In C4, I said “I never claim to be the best …”. But all in all I’m humbled by the fact and appreciate any minute that anyone takes out of their time out to share my music, have blogged discussions, comment one way or the other, about if I’m as good as another, or I’m the best, and so on. I feel like I’m a mustard seed, but with faith to grow.

Audio Response

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Aribaba: Where do you think the hip-hop industry will be in the next 5-10 years?

X.O Senavoe: I think it’s the next big thing. Hip-hop has a whole different flavour in Africa and it’s definitely appealing with the success of many hip-hop musicians. But as long as we’re not copying, or trying to be someone else. I’m not trying to be the next anybody, just trying to be me.

The contacts internationally have been great. A lot of people doing stuff abroad are of African decent, and the industry is getting bigger from Naija, Ghana, South Africa etc. I definitely feel like it’s about to be on a whole new level so I’m excited to be a part of it.

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Aribaba: So the ladies want to know; Are you single?

X.O Senavoe: (Laugh) Umm, yeah, I’m single man. I appreciate my female fans for real. They show me a lot of love and rep X.O Nation hard! I love them all.

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Aribaba: What would you say is you most attractive feature in a woman?

X.O Senavoe: I would say it’s the effortless ability to care. You know some people when they do something for you, they let you know. Like “I did this for you” or “See all the things I’ve done for you,” and all that. But it’s the effortless kind that is attractive. The one that’ll tip the waiter well when you’re looking away, the without-fanfare type. Those that really help somebody when they know they won’t get anything in return, or any cred for it. Obviously being physically attracted to her is important too. I won’t act like I will date someone with my eyes closed. *laughs*. But it really matters to me, for anything long-term, if the person is a genuinely caring person.

Audio Response

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Aribaba: So If you weren’t into music, what would you be doing?

X.O Senavoe: *laughs* If I wasn’t into music, I think law would be a nice thing to do. (laughs) I like sports too, so professional sports too dey inside. I play some small b’ball and soccer, so that wouldn’t be bad. I mean I love music a lot so I don’t know if I want to do anything else… *laughs*

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Aribaba: Give me your Top 5 songs right now.

X.O Senavoe: Hmm. Currently working on music for Xpoint0 so it’s been tough but some joints I’ve listened to recently:

All I Want Is You – Miguel feat. J Cole,

Never Change – Jay-Z,

Raindrops remix (unreleased) – Tu Face (feat X.O Senavoe),

Say What’s Real – Drake,

Tema Motor Highway Freestyle – Paedae feat. Efya

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Aribaba: What would you say you goal is in music? What would you like to be remembered for?

X.O Senavoe: Hmmm (pause) I would like to be … a blessing. Once I’ve achieved all that I wanted to do in music, I’d like for people to have felt blessed, and feel blessed when they listen to my music.

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Last Words: I’ve come to notice that when one is an African or linked to the continent, we (mostly Africans) tend to assume that he or she simply cannot be ‘the best’ in the world at something, academic or per other achievements. We assume that there has to be someone somewhere not from or on the continent doing it better, and we confer respect to folks and achievement locally almost always only when they are ‘okay’ed by folks abroad. I think it’s very unfortunate. We can produce the best at anything – where we’re from should only inspire and inform the course, not curtail it. And should show the same love and respect to our own as we would others. Sorry, was just thinking about that. Also, I want to say thank to you, and to everyone who continues to support the way they do. God richly bless you!

Check out some of the best from X.O Senavoe

*** Taxi Music Free Style ***

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*** Power ***

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*** C4***

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Check out X.O Senavoe’s Blog http://senavoe.blogspot.com/

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=6&sqi=2&ved=0CDsQFjAF&url=http%3A%2F%2Fsenavoe.blogspot.com%2F&rct=j&q=senavoe&ei=B_e5TeqVD4TpgQfsroyvDw&usg=AFQjCNEcJSHmIU-zj5UFIcW8zZzBy6-AJg&sig2=RIA96NRWx2AAN8gDgSWYRQ&cad=rja

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This interview was done the same day, MI was interviewed. If you don’t know P-square were nominated for the BET awards last year. This gave an opportunity, for Wendy Williams to interview them, and talk about their music, and background. Basic stuff sha.

Check it out.

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Courtesy of That1960chick.com

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Check out factory78 interview with Asa. Asa was in London to perform, so it gave the folks at Factory78 the opportunity to catch up with her and interview her about her life, pretty much her foundation in becoming one of the best musicians out of Africa. Enjoy

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Sasha & Naeto C

Storm in the building. BBC’s Jonathan Dimbleby was in Lagos a while ago to visit and he stopped by at Storm Records studio to interview Naeto C and Sasha about hip-hop in Nigeria and how Nigerians are now culturally aware of their music and embracing it. Its a short interview, but I’m sure you will enjoy it.

This is Made in Lagos :) Thanks to That1960chick.com for the video

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Side Note: This interview was part of a 3 part series An African journey with Jonathan Dimbleby which aired on BBC 2 in May 2010

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MI with radio personality Wendy Williams

Last year was undoubtedly M.I’s year with the sucess of his album, and receiving couples of awards world wide, but the highlight of 2010 for MI was getting nominated for the BET awards where he got privileged to interview Wendy Williams. A lot of people had heard but not watched the full video and once again thanks to That1960chick.com, here is the full video interview.

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