Aid Hurts the Receiver

5
<img class=”size-medium wp-image-518″ src=”http://www.jaguda.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/2705sa1-300×196.jpg” alt=”Aid to africa’s poor nations might not be the all it’s made out to be” width=”300″ height=”196″ /> Aid to africa’s poor nations might not be the all it’s made out to be

International aid(1) is designed to save lives, alleviate suffering and address injustices.

As Martin Luther King Jr announced, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” This I do not dispute, but what I dispute is what is meant by “injustice.” Often people cite genocides, female suppression, health care disparities, or child abuse as the sole forms of injustice that need to be tackled. Yes, and I agree, because they are the most visceral. Such “inhumanity” is seen as atrocious because they are the most palatable: they can be easily seen, documented, and someone can be held accountable for it.

But, there are other types of injustices out there. Injustices that cannot be easily traced, cannot be easily accounted for, or easily documented. Such “unseen” injustices are just as much a threat to the “seen” forms of injustice and may even have longer and far reaching implications. For example, the lynching of thousands of Black Americans in the 1960s and the enforced police brutality seen was and still is a form of heinous atrocities. These visions were flashed on TV and in the newspapers prompting many to propel the Civil Rights Movement forward. However, the laws of Jim Crow that were implemented at the same time are still felt today. The Jim Crow Laws were a symbol of institutionalized racism that depicted Black Americans as second-class citizens who deserve poor treatment and minimal chances to reach the heights of their ability.(2)

All this is to say that humanitarian aid right now is a form of subjugation. Humanitarian aid shrouds itself in a veil of peace, harmony, and fighting injustice when in reality, it could be in fact promoting unseen injustices everywhere. Basically, “aid” is a double edge sword. On the one hand, it alleviates the most pressing problems that people face (hunger and sickness). Its aim is to stop the “seen” injustice. But on the other hand, that same “aid” actually impairs the people it is designed to help(3). By giving “aid” or “charity” to a large group of people it promotes dependence. This dependence has two ramifications: a) it endorses that the idea that a person can’t help him or herself; and b) it advocates the idea that a country cannot help (or is unwilling) to help its own people.

Dependence breeds inaptitude and laziness. For example, welfare, which is a form of institutionalized subjugation, forces people to live in poverty and dependence on aid. If one were to obtain a job, welfare would be stopped, even if that job was for minimum wage and could barely put food on the table or pay rent.(4) Therefore, it makes more sense to stay at home in a bathrobe and wait for the government check and the government cheese.

Aid also promotes civil unrest and government corruption. Some of the most funded countries are the ones with civil disobedience. Iraq and Israel are the top two countries getting the most aid from the U.S and they are the two countries that are in constant battle with its people (or neighbors). As for other countries, like Somalia, which also receives a large sum, where does that money go to? More than likely to the pockets of the big politicians who are willing to put a smiling face to their benefactors while grasping the money with an iron fist. Such corruption breeds civil unrest—the people don’t believe in their government. And why should they? The government is the quickest way to money—but government should protect the people. Rather, what “aid” does is that it protects the rich and neglects the poor. Where is Robin Hood when you need him? Can you really blame the Somali pirates?(5)

So, what does unsolicited aid do? It breeds laziness and dependence and creates civil unrest

Next installments—
I. What aid does to the giver.
II. Aid is a form of forced acculturation.

Footnotes:
<h5><span style=”font-weight: normal; font-size: 8pt; font-family: ‘Book Antiqua’; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold;”><span style=”color: #999999;”>[1] Not all forms of aid is bad. I receive financial aid to go to school and I am grateful for it. Aid that is based solely on monetary donation without a need for someone to learn a skill or perform a skill, I argue can probably do more harm than good.</span></span></h5>
<h5><span style=”font-weight: normal; font-size: 8pt; font-family: ‘Book Antiqua’; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold;”><span style=”color: #999999;”>[2] The election of Barack Obama, the first Black American president was symbolic because it showed that perhaps some of that institutionalized racism is slowly falling away.</span></span></h5>
<h5><span style=”font-weight: normal; font-size: 8pt; font-family: ‘Book Antiqua’; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold;”><span style=”color: #999999;”>[3] Aid also impacts the minds of the giver. The giver becomes dependent on the receiver to feel powerful and promote a false belief of superiority. For purposes of brevity, I will only focus on receivers. The next installment will shed light on givers.</span></span></h5>
<h5><span style=”font-weight: normal; font-size: 8pt; font-family: ‘Book Antiqua’; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold;”><span style=”color: #999999;”>[4] There are many other atrocities of welfare. Basically, what is supposed to work in theory does not always work in practice.</span></span></h5>
<h5><span style=”font-weight: normal; font-size: 8pt; font-family: ‘Book Antiqua’; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold;”><span style=”color: #999999;”>[5] The rationale behind what they are doing is not entirely amoral. Lawlessness in a country breeds lawlessness. Without a government that civilians can trust and do what it needs to, its people will create their own law. What is amoral about the Somali pirates is their action. If they take their actions to the next step and advocate killing, then something is really dire in that they feel necessary to take a life. Rather, they view their plight as their back against the wall. When shoved, they hope they can shove harder.</span></span></h5>Rich Text Area









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Aid to africa's poor nations might not be the all it's made out to be

Aid to africa’s poor nations might not be the all it’s made out to be

International aid(1) is designed to save lives, alleviate suffering and address injustices.


As Martin Luther King Jr announced, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” This I do not dispute, but what I dispute is what is meant by “injustice.” Often people cite genocides, female suppression, health care disparities, or child abuse as the sole forms of injustice that need to be tackled. Yes, and I agree, because they are the most visceral. Such “inhumanity” is seen as atrocious because they are the most palatable: they can be easily seen, documented, and someone can be held accountable for it.


But, there are other types of injustices out there. Injustices that cannot be easily traced, cannot be easily accounted for, or easily documented. Such “unseen” injustices are just as much a threat to the “seen” forms of injustice and may even have longer and far reaching implications. For example, the lynching of thousands of Black Americans in the 1960s and the enforced police brutality seen was and still is a form of heinous atrocities. These visions were flashed on TV and in the newspapers prompting many to propel the Civil Rights Movement forward. However, the laws of Jim Crow that were implemented at the same time are still felt today. The Jim Crow Laws were a symbol of institutionalized racism that depicted Black Americans as second-class citizens who deserve poor treatment and minimal chances to reach the heights of their ability.(2)


All this is to say that humanitarian aid right now is a form of subjugation. Humanitarian aid shrouds itself in a veil of peace, harmony, and fighting injustice when in reality, it could be in fact promoting unseen injustices everywhere. Basically, “aid” is a double edge sword. On the one hand, it alleviates the most pressing problems that people face (hunger and sickness). Its aim is to stop the “seen” injustice. But on the other hand, that same “aid” actually impairs the people it is designed to help(3). By giving “aid” or “charity” to a large group of people it promotes dependence. This dependence has two ramifications: a) it endorses that the idea that a person can’t help him or herself; and b) it advocates the idea that a country cannot help (or is unwilling) to help its own people.


Dependence breeds inaptitude and laziness. For example, welfare, which is a form of institutionalized subjugation, forces people to live in poverty and dependence on aid. If one were to obtain a job, welfare would be stopped, even if that job was for minimum wage and could barely put food on the table or pay rent.(4) Therefore, it makes more sense to stay at home in a bathrobe and wait for the government check and the government cheese.


Aid also promotes civil unrest and government corruption. Some of the most funded countries are the ones with civil disobedience. Iraq and Israel are the top two countries getting the most aid from the U.S and they are the two countries that are in constant battle with its people (or neighbors). As for other countries, like Somalia, which also receives a large sum, where does that money go to? More than likely to the pockets of the big politicians who are willing to put a smiling face to their benefactors while grasping the money with an iron fist. Such corruption breeds civil unrest—the people don’t believe in their government. And why should they? The government is the quickest way to money—but government should protect the people. Rather, what “aid” does is that it protects the rich and neglects the poor. Where is Robin Hood when you need him? Can you really blame the Somali pirates?(5)


So, what does unsolicited aid do? It breeds laziness and dependence and creates civil unrest


Next installments—
I. What aid does to the giver.
II. Aid is a form of forced acculturation.


Footnotes:


[1] Not all forms of aid is bad. I receive financial aid to go to school and I am grateful for it. Aid that is based solely on monetary donation without a need for someone to learn a skill or perform a skill, I argue can probably do more harm than good.

[2] The election of Barack Obama, the first Black American president was symbolic because it showed that perhaps some of that institutionalized racism is slowly falling away.

[3] Aid also impacts the minds of the giver. The giver becomes dependent on the receiver to feel powerful and promote a false belief of superiority. For purposes of brevity, I will only focus on receivers. The next installment will shed light on givers.

[4] There are many other atrocities of welfare. Basically, what is supposed to work in theory does not always work in practice.

[5] The rationale behind what they are doing is not entirely amoral. Lawlessness in a country breeds lawlessness. Without a government that civilians can trust and do what it needs to, its people will create their own law. What is amoral about the Somali pirates is their action. If they take their actions to the next step and advocate killing, then something is really dire in that they feel necessary to take a life. Rather, they view their plight as their back against the wall. When shoved, they hope they can shove harder.



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Word count: 904  Last edited by Aphrodite on April 16, 2009 at 11:13 am